“Think More Do Less” book launch

Think More, Do Less by Sean Carey, published by HITE
“If you find something works, then try doing less” said Marjory Barlow

Term 4 (of 9)

A new book on the Alexander Technique is always a cause for celebration.  So it proved last week as the corks popped at the launch from HITE Limited of Think More, Do Less: Improving Your Teaching of the Alexander Technique with Marjory Barlow written by Seán Carey.  Marjory Barlow (1915 – 2006) was FM Alexander’s niece. Not only did she have a close family connection, but she trained with him as a teacher in the 1930s, and subsequently ran a training school with her husband Dr Wilfred Barlow.

Think More Do Less book launch
A mixture of Alexander teachers, trainees and pupils attended the launch

The author, Seán Carey, qualified as an Alexander teacher in 1986 and had individual and group lessons with Marjory over several years in the late 1990s.  This is the fruit of those lessons, capturing what he experienced from her words and her hands, and observing his fellow teachers learning. It is neatly bookended by a foreword from senior teacher Anne Battye (who trained with Marjory and worked as her training course assistant) and Seán’s write-up of his lesson and subsequent interview with Elisabeth Walker. She was a lifelong friend of Marjory’s and the last of the ‘first-generation’ teachers – the interview dates from 2013, shortly before she died.

Anne Battye and Brita Forsstrom
“Suit the action to the words, the words to the action” was one of Marjory’s favourite quotes, according to Anne Battye (left), shown here talking with Brita Forsstrom

 With his social anthropology background, Seán sees a value in recording how people who knew and worked with FM Alexander taught.  Much of the training for Alexander teachers takes place via an oral tradition, or is passed on kinaesthetically through use of the hands. As the generations pass there is little documentation about actual practice, particularly from the earlier teachers.  Think More Do Less describes many of the crucial details involved in standard practical Alexander procedures as taught by Marjory.  “It’s a historical record of how she taught, and how she thought FM (Alexander) taught” he told me, shortly before the book’s publication.

Sean Carey
Seán Carey

It was clear to Seán that Marjory expected the lesson to be about learning, not just having a pleasant time. As a pupil you had to be an active and thinking participant, not expecting her to do the work for you. “She wouldn’t let you get away with very much.  You had to learn to direct. Standing in front of her teaching chair, she matched the verbal directions she gave you for the head-neck-back relationship with her hands. Because of that your stature increased. However, you were responsible for bending your knees, without losing your internal length.”

She always began with the pupil in the chair, then worked with them lying down on the couch or table (the opposite way round from her husband). She would start with the head and neck, moving to the limbs and back to the head and neck again. This conveyed an immediate physical awareness of the importance of the head and neck in enabling freedom of movement in the rest of the body.

Seán is unequivocal about the value of listening to our first-generation Alexander forebears. “It would be foolish not to take note of what she did and learn from the source. Learning to teach the Alexander Technique is like climbing Mount Everest” he concluded. “You definitely want to talk to people who’ve been to the top before you start, and you also want a good sherpa to get you to the summit and back down again. Marjory Barlow is like Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay combined”.

Think More Do Less is written for current and trainee teachers, and for people who have had a lot of Alexander lessons. It already sits proudly on my Alexander bookshelf and I can see myself using it for guidance as I continue my journey from Alexander base camp towards the summit.

 

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